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2016 Archived Content

In the U.S. alone, there are an estimated 47.8 million illnesses, over 127,000 hospitalizations and 3,000-plus deaths attributed to foodborne illness each year. Traditional means for microbial detection can no longer match the pace of today’s food processing and global distribution networks. Emerging rapid sensor and detection platforms can provide the timely and actionable information needed to lessen the human and economic burdens levied by foodborne disease.

This conference will feature presentations on emerging optical, nanotechnological, spectroscopic and genomic technologies for pathogen detection and characterization, including label-free and high-throughput methods. Benefits and challenges of these new methods and their comparison with existing techniques will be discussed. The fundamental importance of pre-analytical sample preparation to detection outcomes and the competing paradigms of culture-based vs. culture-independent approaches will also be emphasized.

Final Agenda

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MONDAY, JUNE 27

7:00 am Registration and Morning Coffee

8:25 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Arun Bhunia, Ph.D., Professor of Food Microbiology, Department of Food Science, Purdue University


»» 8:30 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE OF FOOD SAFETY IN PUBLIC HEALTH – GENOMICS AND METAGENOMICS

Peter_Gerner-SmidtPeter Gerner-Smidt, M.D., DMS, Chief, Enteric Disease Laboratory Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, United States Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

The role of public health in food safety is to monitor trends in and detect, investigate, and control outbreaks of foodborne illnesses in humans. Using information generated from whole genome sequences of cultures, metagenomic assays that include sequencing the pathogens directly from the clinical specimen will be designed to ideally provide the same information that is generated by whole genome sequencing of cultures.


METHODS OVERVIEW

9:00 Rapid Methods - Where They Come From and How They Have Impacted Food Testing

Peter_FengPeter Feng, Ph.D., Research Microbiologist, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

The FDA is responsible for ensuring the safety of food that enters into “interstate” commerce. The assessment that foods are free of pathogens relies heavily on testing, hence method development tends to evolve parallel to food safety regulations. Rapid methods are more sensitive than conventional assays, but the increased sensitivity has also created interesting challenges and problems for the regulatory agencies and the food industry.

9:30 Culture-Independent Methods for Food Safety

Bart_WeimerBart Weimer, Ph.D., Professor, Director, Population Health and Reproduction, University of California, Davis

Use of genome and metagenome tools are moving quickly for food safety applications. Additionally, use of capture and concentration methods are gaining acceptance for pathogen detection directly from foodstuffs. These new methods are not widely adopted by the food industry, yet are being adopted for regulation. This session will provide practical insights and method evaluation for this new area of food safety.

10:00 Coffee Break in the Ballroom Foyer

10:30 Recent Developments in Rapid, Immunoassay-Based Methods for Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli and Shiga Toxin

Andrew_GehringAndrew Gehring, Ph.D., Research Chemist, Lead Scientist at USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)


11:00 Paper-Based Analytical Devices for Detection of Foodborne Bacteria

Bledar_BishaBledar Bisha, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Food Microbiology, University of Wyoming

Paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) are detection platforms which offer easy-to-use and inexpensive alternatives to current diagnostic methods used in food microbiology. A comprehensive summary of recent developments in μPAD-based detection of foodborne bacteria will be presented, including strategies to enhance sensitivity and specificity, enhanced sample preparation, and the potential role these devices can occupy as a tool in field-based diagnostics.

11:30 Sponsored Presentation (Opportunity Available)

12:00 pm Luncheon Presentation (Sponsorship Opportunity Available) or Lunch on Your Own

 

OPTICAL METHODS & SPECTROSCOPY FOR FOOD SAFETY

1:55 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Gary R. Acuff, Ph.D., Professor and Texas A&M AgriLife Research Faculty Fellow; Director, Center for Food Safety, Texas A&M University

 

2:00 Advances in Flow Cytometry for Rapid Detection of Foodborne Pathogens

Byron_Brehm-StecherByron Brehm-Stecher, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Rapid Microbial Detection & Control Laboratory, Iowa State University

Flow cytometry (FCM) is an instrumental tool for rapid detection and characterization of microbial cells based on their light scatter and fluorescence properties. Although FCM was developed originally for analysis of relatively large mammalian cells, it is finding increased use by microbiologists, including food microbiologists. An overview of FCM’s use in microbiology, including the latest advances in FCM technology and data analysis techniques, will be provided.

2:30 Optical Scattering Sensor for Label-Free Rapid Detection of Pathogen and Indicator Bacterial Colonies on Petri-plate

Arun_BhuniaArun Bhunia, Ph.D., Professor of Food Microbiology, Department of Food Science, Purdue University

The laser optical sensor, designated BARDOT (bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology) has been shown to directly identify bacterial colonies on Petri-plate without any probes or labeling reagents. BARDOT has been successfully used for detection of Enterobacteriaceae and coliforms, which are widely used as “indicators” for pathogen contamination to evaluate microbiological quality and safety, and to assess sanitary and hygienic practices employed during food production, preparation, handling and storage.

3:00 Rapid and Reagent-Free Identification of Antibiotic-Resistant Nosocomial Bacteria by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

Jacqueline Sedman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry, McGill University

The capability of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to discriminate between antibiotic-resistant and susceptible strains in the absence of antibiotic such as VRE and MRSA provides a new rapid and reagent-free method that can contribute to timely diagnosis of antibiotic-resistant nosocomial infections.

3:30 Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

4:15 PANEL DISCUSSION: Rapid Detection Methods for Food Safety: Overcoming Barriers to Implementation

Moderators:

Arun_BhuniaArun Bhunia, Ph.D., Professor of Food Microbiology, Department of Food Science, Purdue University


Byron_Brehm-StecherByron Brehm-Stecher, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Rapid Microbial Detection & Control Laboratory, Iowa State University


Panelists:

Gary_AcuffGary R. Acuff, Ph.D., Professor and Texas A&M AgriLife Research Faculty Fellow; Director, Center for Food Safety, Texas A&M University


Bart_WeimerBart Weimer, Ph.D., Professor, Director, Population Health and Reproduction, University of California, Davis


Rapid detection methods are critical in insuring the safety of consumers and avoid costly product recalls. This panel will explore the latest rapid detection methods for food safety, discuss the pros and cons of each method and examine the challenges to overcome the barriers to implementation.

5:15 Welcome Reception in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

6:15 End of Day

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TUESDAY, JUNE 28

8:00 am Morning Coffee

8:25 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Byron Brehm-Stecher, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Rapid Microbial Detection & Control Laboratory, Iowa State University 


»» 8:30 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION - HOW TO VALIDATE PROCESS CONTROL WHEN YOU CAN’T FIND PATHOGENS: USING INDICATORS AND SURROGATES

Gary_AcuffGary R. Acuff, Ph.D., Professor and Texas A&M AgriLife Research Faculty Fellow; Director, Center for Food Safety, Texas A&M University

It is increasingly important to assure that process interventions to control pathogenic bacteria are functioning correctly and achieving desired goals. Validation is a fundamental part of HACCP, and processors who currently have HACCP plans in place should validate their plans and process control as part of proper implementation. This presentation will provide a practical approach to developing validation protocols, specifically addressing the utilization of indicators or surrogate bacteria to estimate pathogen response to process controls.


NANOTECHNOLOGICAL AND BACTERIOPHAGE-BASED APPROACHES FOR PATHOGEN DETECTION

9:00 New Advanced Colorimetric Assay Performed during the Enrichment Process for the Detection of Foodborne Pathogens

Bruce_ApplegateBruce Applegate, Ph.D., Professor, Center for Food Safety Engineering, Purdue University

Methodology for the detection of foodborne pathogens requires an enrichment step which is the time sink in most protocols. A colorimetric method which exploits this step for detection has been developed for E. coli O157:H7. The method also allows for the selective recovery of the pathogen if present and can be developed for other organisms as well.

9:30 Cassette PCR for Rapid Detection of Pathogenic Escherichia coli in Meat

Dammika P. Manage Ph.D.*, Research Associate, University of Alberta; *Contributing Authors: Jana Lauzon, Patrick Ward, Patrick M. Pilarski, Linda Pilarski, Lynn M. McMullen

10:00 Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

10:45 Magnetophoretic Chromatography for the Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria with the Naked Eye

Sanghee Lee, Ph.D., Research Associate, Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Korea

A facile and sensitive analytical method that uses gold-coated magnetic nanoparticle clusters (Au/MNCs) and magnetophoretic chromatography with a precision pipet has been developed for the detection of Salmonella bacteria. Once the magnetophoretic chromatography process has been carried out for 10 min, the presence of 100 cfu/mL Salmonella bacteria can be detected with the naked eye.

11:15 A Disposable Cartridge for Automated Universal Sample Preparation System

Michael Connolly, Ph.D., President & CEO, Integrated Nano-Technologies, LLC

INT has developed an automated sample preparation system which incorporates magnetic clean-up utilizing nano-magnetic particles followed by size exclusion column. The system uses an aggressive sample disruption enabling effective isolation of nucleic acids from a wide variety of samples, including blood, tissue, food, soil and whole insects.

11:45 Engineering Bacteriophage for the Ultrasensitive Detection of Foodborne Pathogens

Troy_HinkleyTroy Hinkley, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts*

The top 14 foodborne pathogens in the United States create almost 9 million infections per year and almost half (~46%) are linked to leafy green produce contaminated from soiled agricultural water. As a result, we have developed a bacteriophage-based detection system to identify and quantify bacterial contaminants. * Angelyca A. Jackson, Samuel D. Alcaine & Sam R. Nugen

12:15 pm Close of Conference



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