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Next Generation Batteries 2017
Next Generation Batteries 2017

WORKSHOP 3: VEHICLE-TO-GRID (V2G) TECHNOLOGIES

Monday, April 18 | 8:30-11:30 am


Where is the value of V2G? The number of operating plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in the United States is the largest in the world (over 375,000), with California being the largest. Thus, the flow of power in and out of these PEVs can be valuable to the electric grid, but only if it is provided precisely when needed. This workshop addresses technologies and benefits for adoption of V2G.

  • Determining PEV benefits, and battery life challenges
  • Developing and testing grid interoperability standards
  • Developing and evaluating bi-directional power flow
  • Integrated V2G systems for reducing peak-power demands
  • Exploring grid services technology opportunities

Instructors:

Rajit Gadh, Ph.D., Professor, Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science; Founder & Director, Smart Grid Energy Research Center (SMERC) and UCLA WINMEC Consortium, University of California, Los Angeles

Darren Hammell, Co-Founder & Chief Strategy Officer, Business Development, Princeton Power Systems

Aaron Hunter, MSc, Ph.D., Research Faculty, School of Computing & Centre for Cybersecurity, British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT)

Satoru Shinzaki, Project Manager, Environmental Business Development Office, American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

Grid to EV and EV to Grid - Technologies to Enable Energy Storage on the Grid

Rajit Gadh, Ph.D., Professor, Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science; Founder & Director, Smart Grid Energy Research Center (SMERC) and UCLA WINMEC Consortium, University of California, Los Angeles

Grid-to-Vehicle (G2V) and Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) are technologies that enable distributed energy storage within the electric grid. G2V stores over-generated power to the batteries of electric vehicles (EVs). G2V enables grid control services. V2G enables more diverse grid control with the EV acting as a virtual generator for short periods of time. These are being researched as part of the UCLA Smart Grid Energy Research Center (SMERC) within the WINSmartEVTM project.

V2G EV Charging: The Groundbreaking Technology of Today & the Future

Darren Hammell, Co-Founder & Chief Strategy Officer, Business Development, Princeton Power Systems

When the first electric vehicles rolled out of factories in North America, the fascination of a car having to only run on electricity had great potential as gas prices skyrocketed. The promise of a lower carbon footprint enticed consumers. However, consumers were dissatisfied with leaving their car to charge from overnight to 24 hours at a time. Princeton Power Systems’ fast-charging technology is a solution.

Electric Vehicles for Power Storage: Knowledge Representation and Simulation

Aaron Hunter, MSc, Ph.D., Research Faculty, School of Computing & Centre for Cybersecurity, British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT)

Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) systems allow consumers to use their vehicles as storage devices. In principle, this kind of storage can be used to reduce both cost and greenhouse emissions. In practice, however, it turns out that the benefits vary greatly depending on the data model and storage algorithm. In this presentation, we discuss the development of grid simulations to explore and experiment with power storage algorithms, in order to maximize the benefits.

Advancing toward Vehicle-to-Grid Technology

Satoru Shinzaki, Project Manager, Environmental Business Development Office, American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

As renewable sources on a power grid grow, it will become more difficult to maintain balance between power supply and coincident demand, because of frequent and significant changes of renewable generation. As a means of resolving this imbalance, utilizing on-board batteries as a distributed energy resource is being discussed for stabilizing the power grid. The presentation discusses the configuration and the outcome of the demonstration of utilizing bi-directional vehicle power transfer for stabilizing the grid. It will also discuss issues toward wide adoption of the technology.

Instructor Biographies:

Rajit_GadhRajit Gadh, Ph.D., Professor, Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science; Founder & Director, Smart Grid Energy Research Center (SMERC) and UCLA WINMEC Consortium, University of California, Los Angeles

Dr. Rajit Gadh is Professor at the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science at UCLA, Founder and Director of the Smart Grid Energy Research Center or SMERC, and Founder and Director of the UCLA WINMEC Consortium. Dr. Gadh has a doctorate degree from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), a master’s from Cornell University and a bachelor’s degree from IIT Kanpur, all in engineering. Dr. Gadh's current research interests include modeling and control of Smart Grids, wireless monitoring and control of distribution and consumer-premise power grids, Electric Vehicle aggregation, modeling and control, optimized EV charging under grid and local constraints, Grid-to-vehicle, Vehicle-to-grid and Grid-to-home architectures, automation and home area network for Demand Response, Micro-grid modeling and control, and wireless-sensor and RFID middleware architectures. Dr. Gadh is author of over 150 articles in journals and conference proceedings and 4 patents. His team has developed the WINSmartEV™ and WINSmartGrid™ research platforms at UCLA.

Darren_HammellDarren Hammell, Co-Founder & Chief Strategy Officer, Business Development, Princeton Power Systems

Darren took home top honors in the Princeton University business plan contest and co-founded Princeton Power Systems in 2001. He served as President and CEO until March 2009, when he took on the responsibility of Executive Vice President and later Chief Strategy Officer. Darren was named one of Red Herring Magazine‘s “Young Moguls” in 2005 and New Jersey-BIZ’s “Forty Under 40” business leaders in the state the same year. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the nonprofit New Jersey Technology Council and the Einstein’s Alley Technology Collaborative. Darren graduated with honors from Princeton University with a BSE in Computer Science.

Aaron_HunterAaron Hunter, MSc, Ph.D., Research Faculty, School of Computing & Centre for Cybersecurity, British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT)

Aaron Hunter is a faculty member in the School of Computing at the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT), and the lead researcher at the BCIT Centre for Cybersecurity. He holds an MSc in Mathematics and a Ph.D. in Computing Science, both from Simon Fraser University in greater Vancouver, Canada. Aaron’s research interests are in formal models for Knowledge Representation, with an emphasis on industrial applications. He is recognized in particular for his work on the theory of belief change, and the use of belief change operators to reason about trust and the security of communication protocols. In his current work, Aaron is again bridging the gap between theory and practice, using the formal methods of logic-based Artificial Intelligence to develop and analyze intelligent power management strategies.

Satoru_ShinzakiSatoru Shinzaki, Project Manager, Environmental Business Development Office, American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

Satoru Shinzaki is Project Manager of the Environmental Business Development Office of American Honda Motor Co., Inc. After engaged with designing electric motors and generators for industrial applications and distributed power resources, he joined Honda R&D in 1999. Beginning with the development of the first generation Civic Hybrid, he has been involved in the development of various electrified vehicle systems, including the plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles. He was also involved with research on batteries as well as the technology of integrating vehicles into the power grid. Since 2015, he has assumed responsibility for environmental business development in Torrance, California. He holds a master’s degree in control engineering from the Tokyo Institute of Technology.



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